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Karz nibhaya - DNA e-paper

Discussion in 'Movie Reviews - Media' started by Wafa, Nov 17, 2007.

  1. Wafa

    Wafa I want my Mom!!!

    Om Shanti Om
    Direction: Farah Khan
    Cast: Shah Rukh Khan, Deepika Padukone, Arjun Rampal, Shreyas Talpade, Kiran Kher
    Rating: ***½

    No one, but no one, does the ‘70s as well as Farah Khan. If in her first film ‘Main Hoon Naa’ she incorporated bits and pieces from that era, in her new film ‘Om Shanti Om’ she goes ahead full throttle and constructs the entire first half in that decade, bringing into technicolour focus all that was kitschy as well as brilliant then.

    It is one of the most identifiable of stories, the abiding love of a common man Om (Shah Rukh Khan), in this case a junior artiste or ‘extra’, for superstar Shanti (Deepika Padukone). That they actually meet and get to know one another a little only adds to the poignancy of the story. When she is killed by her shyster husband, film producer Mukesh Mehra (Arjun Rampal) and Om dies saving her, you want to weep for them.

    But this is an entertainer and you may have laughed and cried with the protagonists but its time to move on.

    A diktat the film takes seriously as it leaps forward 30 years, and this time the junior artiste is born into a superstar’s home and grows up to be a superstar himself, Om Kapoor (SRK naturally).

    The rest is all about living life kingsize as superstars do, indulging in some neat revenge on the way. Farah and Shah Rukh Khan pull out all the stops to keep the story moving at a frenetic pace and keep the viewer entertained. Om’s mother in his earlier birth Kirron Kher (hilarious as the OTT mother for whom life is one long performance) turns up to claim him still as active as ever, and his best buddy, co junior artiste Pappu (Shreyas Talpade) is now a confidante of his.

    In the very memorable title song 31 past and present actors turn up to congratulate him when he wins an award, a super testimony to the goodwill the actor and director enjoy.

    Shah Rukh Khan is in fine fettle in every scene and performs with much gusto. His take-off on South Indian heroes mixed with quick gun Murugan is to die for. His six-pack abs is pure eye candy in the ‘Dard-e-Disco’ song and if he had been around in the ‘70s he would surely have given the reigning superstars a run for their money. Deepika Padukone is 24 carat heroine material, lovely to look at and an able performer. Shreyas Talpade is terrific and Arjun Rampal very effective.

    Everything comes together to create one of the best mainstream films this year. While cinematography (V Manikanandan) is unobtrusively brilliant, Vishal and Shekhar’s music ups the pep ante. Shirish Kunder’s editing and Sabu Cyril’s production design also add to the overall potency of the scenes.

    But all in all this is Farah’s film and if PhDs were given for effectively translating passion for cinema to objects for mass consumption, we would have Dr Farah Khan on our hands.

    DNA e-paper
     

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